News & Events

Amy Kimme Hea (RCTE Associate Professor and Writing Program Director), Aimee Mapes (Assistant Writing Program Director), and RCTE doctoral students Kenny Walker and Ana Ribero have been awarded a $10,000 Research Initiative grant from the Conference on College Composition and Communication (CCCC) for their project "The University of Arizona Longitudinal Study of Student Writers."   This is the...
Katie Silvester, doctoral student in RCTE, has received a $20,000 American Fellowship from the American Association of University Women (AAUW).  AAUW is the nation's leading voice promoting equity and education for women and girls,  empowering women as individuals and as a community since 1881.  For more than 130 years, AAUW has worked together as a national grassroots organization to improve the...
RCTE Graduate Student, Rachael Wendler, has received the highly competitive $15,000 Scholar's Award from the P.E.O. Sisterhood. The P.E.O. Scholar Awards was established in 1991 to provide substantial merit-based awards for women in the US and Canada who are pursuing a doctoral level degree at an accredited college or university. Founded January 21, 1869, at Iowa Wesleyan College, the P.E.O....
Sarah Schoenbrun (MFA 2012) has an essay, "Ekphrasis," in Seneca Review.
Fri, 04/25/2014 - 6:00pm
Come travel with us from Kansas to the Emerald City through film, art, music, and stories in an evening celebrating the 75th anniversary of the movie The Wizard of Oz. This event features readings from L. Frank Baum's wonderful Oz series, on which the movie was based.
Excerpts feature - of course - beloved Dorothy and her "meat dog," as Toto's referred to early on in this weird little book. But...

April 2014

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The 26th Annual Arizona Quarterly Symposium Apr 3 2014 (All day) to Apr 5 2014 (All day)
 
 
 
 
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Apr 8 2014 - 4:00pm to 5:00pm
 
 
Apr 10 2014 - 3:30pm to 4:30pm
 
 
 
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Apr 18 2014 - 4:00pm to 5:00pm
 
 
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Apr 25 2014 - 6:00pm to 8:00pm
 
 
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Bookshelf

Mestiz@ Scripts, Digital Migrations, and the Territories of Writing by Damian Baca

 

Conventional scholarship on written communication positions the Western alphabet as a precondition for literacy. Thus, pictographic, non-verbal writing practices of Mesoamerica remain obscured by representations of lettered speech. This book examines how contemporary Mestiz@ scripts challenge alphabetic dominance, thereby undermining the colonized territories of "writing." Strategic weavings of Aztec and European inscription systems not only promote historically-grounded accounts of how...

The Fallen Sky by Chris Cokinos

“Christopher Cokinos goes from pole to pole in his search for the bits of cosmos that fall onto the Earth, and the remarkable people who collect and study them. He is a natural philosopher and gifted writer who sprinkles his own kind of stardust on every page. If you have ever wished upon a falling star, this is your chance to know just what is falling, where it comes from, what it tells us about our place in the universe – and what things in life are worth wishing for.”

Chet Raymo, former...

The Anxiety of Everyday Objects by Aurelie Sheehan

Excerpt from Chapter One

All good secretaries will eventually find truth in the hearts of men.
Winona Bartlett, Win to her friends, might not have been the world’s best secretary, but her nature was such that serving, subservience, and coffee service came easily, and, in fact, she felt there was an inherent good in doing things well, and this determination more than equaled her actual interest in the long-term prospects at Grecko Mauster Crill. She practiced her secretarial role as a Zen...
Manuel Muñoz’s stories move beyond traditional themes of Chicano literature to explore conflicts of family, memory, longing, and loss. In the lonely rural towns of California’s Central Valley, his characters struggle to maintain hope and independence in the face of isolation. In the title story, a teenager learns the consequences of succumbing to the lure of a stranger; in another, a young farmworker attempts to hide his supervision of a huddle of children from the police. Bighearted and...

Game Work: Language, Power, and Computer Game Culture by Ken S. McAllister

As the popularity of computer games has exploded over the past decade, both scholars and game industry professionals have recognized the necessity of treating games less as frivolous entertainment and more as artifacts of culture worthy of political, social, economic, rhetorical, and aesthetic analysis. Ken McAllister notes in his introduction to Game Work that, even though games are essentially impractical, they are nevertheless important mediating agents for the broad exercise of socio-...

Genius Loci by Alison Deming

From a poet and essayist whose writing about nature has won her comparisons with Gary Snyder and Terry Tempest Williams comes a new collection that offers further evidence of her ability to trace the intersections of the human and nonhuman worlds. The title poem is a lyrical excavation of the city of Prague, where layers of history, culture and nature have accumulated to form “a genius loci”—a guardian spirit.
From Penguin.Com
 

AZ 100 Indie Films: A State of Arizona Centennial Celebration by Judd Ethan Ruggill, Ken S. McAllister

A catalog of the 100 films selected by the Arizona Media Arts Center to celebrate the 2012 Centennial of Arizona statehood. Includes copious film and filmmaker information, a guide to film themes for teachers and scholars, and a still from each film. Black & White with Color cover. 200 pages.

The Available World by Ander Monson

“[Ander Monson’s] poems celebrate defiant excess. In this land of scarcity, right-living involves using up what you have, where you have it; otherwise someone might wreck, steal, or use it and you might not get any. A carpe diem for obscure, doomed youth.”—Stephen Burt

Keeping Faith by Fenton Johnson

WINNER OF A LAMBDA LITERARY AWARD AND A KENTUCKY LITERARY AWARD
In a resonant account of his spiritual quest, Fenton Johnson examines what it means for a skeptic to have and to keep faith. Exploring Western and Eastern monastic traditions, Johnson lives as a member of the community at the Trappist Abbey of Gethsemani in Kentucky and the branches of the San Francisco Zen Center. Ultimately his encounter with Buddhism brings him to a new understanding and embrace of Christianity. Weaving together...

Out of Bounds by Matthew Abraham

Academic freedom is a key element of the academic enterprise in the U.S. However, it does not seem to exist when scholars seek to advocate on behalf of Palestinian self-determination.
This unique work examines how the knowledge-power nexus is shaping the discourse around the Israel-Palestine conflict and restricting academic freedom. Beginning with a discussion of American Zionism, the work proceeds to explain why scholars working on the question of Palestine are often denied standard academic...