News & Events

Amy Kimme Hea (RCTE Associate Professor and Writing Program Director), Aimee Mapes (Assistant Writing Program Director), and RCTE doctoral students Kenny Walker and Ana Ribero have been awarded a $10,000 Research Initiative grant from the Conference on College Composition and Communication (CCCC) for their project "The University of Arizona Longitudinal Study of Student Writers."   This is the...
Amy Kimme Hea (RCTE Associate Professor and Writing Program Director), Aimee Mapes (Assistant Writing Program Director), and RCTE doctoral students Kenny Walker and Ana Ribero have been awarded a $10,000 Research Initiative grant from the Conference on College Composition and Communication (CCCC) for their project "The University of Arizona Longitudinal Study of Student Writers."   This is the...
Katie Silvester, doctoral student in RCTE, has received a $20,000 American Fellowship from the American Association of University Women (AAUW).  AAUW is the nation's leading voice promoting equity and education for women and girls,  empowering women as individuals and as a community since 1881.  For more than 130 years, AAUW has worked together as a national grassroots organization to improve the...
RCTE Graduate Student, Rachael Wendler, has received the highly competitive $15,000 Scholar's Award from the P.E.O. Sisterhood. The P.E.O. Scholar Awards was established in 1991 to provide substantial merit-based awards for women in the US and Canada who are pursuing a doctoral level degree at an accredited college or university. Founded January 21, 1869, at Iowa Wesleyan College, the P.E.O....
Fri, 04/25/2014 - 6:00pm
Come travel with us from Kansas to the Emerald City through film, art, music, and stories in an evening celebrating the 75th anniversary of the movie The Wizard of Oz. This event features readings from L. Frank Baum's wonderful Oz series, on which the movie was based.
Excerpts feature - of course - beloved Dorothy and her "meat dog," as Toto's referred to early on in this weird little book. But...

April 2014

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The 26th Annual Arizona Quarterly Symposium Apr 3 2014 (All day) to Apr 5 2014 (All day)
 
 
 
 
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Apr 8 2014 - 4:00pm to 5:00pm
 
 
Apr 10 2014 - 3:30pm to 4:30pm
 
 
 
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Apr 18 2014 - 4:00pm to 5:00pm
 
 
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Apr 22 2014 - 4:30pm to 5:30pm
 
 
 
Apr 25 2014 - 6:00pm to 8:00pm
 
 
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Bookshelf

The Available World by Ander Monson

“[Ander Monson’s] poems celebrate defiant excess. In this land of scarcity, right-living involves using up what you have, where you have it; otherwise someone might wreck, steal, or use it and you might not get any. A carpe diem for obscure, doomed youth.”—Stephen Burt

Genius Loci by Alison Deming

From a poet and essayist whose writing about nature has won her comparisons with Gary Snyder and Terry Tempest Williams comes a new collection that offers further evidence of her ability to trace the intersections of the human and nonhuman worlds. The title poem is a lyrical excavation of the city of Prague, where layers of history, culture and nature have accumulated to form “a genius loci”—a guardian spirit.
From Penguin.Com
 

The Making of Barack Obama: The Politics of Persuasion by Matthew Abraham

 “From the inspiring slogans and speeches of his campaign to the eloquent successes and failures of his presidency, Barack Obama has been extravagantly praised and sarcastically criticized for the distinctive power of his rhetoric. The essays in this collection persuasively analyze that rhetoric in all its specific tactics and general strategies, in its idealist yearnings and its pragmatic compromises, in its ambitious strivings and its political obstacles.”
President’s Professor of...

Mestiz@ Scripts, Digital Migrations, and the Territories of Writing by Damian Baca

 

Conventional scholarship on written communication positions the Western alphabet as a precondition for literacy. Thus, pictographic, non-verbal writing practices of Mesoamerica remain obscured by representations of lettered speech. This book examines how contemporary Mestiz@ scripts challenge alphabetic dominance, thereby undermining the colonized territories of "writing." Strategic weavings of Aztec and European inscription systems not only promote historically-grounded accounts of how...

Grounds of Literary Criticism by Suresh Raval

Between the foundationalist stance that seeks to eliminate disputes by finding the right answers and the relativist postion that regards disagreements as pointless quarrels that can never be resolved, Suresh Raval advocates a refreshing new perspective: a rehabilitation of controversy that recognizes the essentially contestable nature of critical concepts.
Proposing an antifoundationalist exploration of the problems of literary criticism and theory, Raval argues that critical debates, though...

Geography of the Heart by Fenton Johnson

With grace and affection, Johnson recounts the history of “how I fell in love, how I came to be with someone else, and how he came to death and how I helped, how in the end love enables us to continue beyond death.” At the same time, Johnson interweaves two stories: his own upbringing as the youngest of a Kentucky whiskey maker’s nine children, and that of his lover Larry Rose, the only child of German Jews, survivors of the Holocaust. Johnson’s writing has been described by Barbara Kingsolver...

Jack Kerouac is Pregnant: Stories by Aurelie Sheehan

Excerpt from “Jack Kerouac Is Pregnant”
How to Be a Passenger on a Motorcycle

The motorcycle owner gets on the bike. He’s stomped on the clutch or whatever that thing is, the choke maybe. He dons his big helmet, puts on his big black gloves, lifts his leg over the hulking machine. He situates himself on the seat, revs, adjusts the mirror, and looks at you, standing on the sidewalk like an orphan. You take the cue. You tentatively put on your helmet, a white one unlike his black one, and you’...

A Palace of Pearls by Jane Miller

In this book-length sequence, animated by a confrontation with her dead father, Jane Miller meditates on home, love, war and the responsibility of the poet. A Palace of Pearls is inspired by one of the most spectacular civilizations in history, the Arab kingdom of Al-Andalus—a Middle Age civilization where architecture, science and art flourished and Christians, Jews, and Muslims lived in relative harmony. The reader roams through "rooms," encountering Greek, Judaic, and Roman mythology, and...

Out of Bounds by Matthew Abraham

Academic freedom is a key element of the academic enterprise in the U.S. However, it does not seem to exist when scholars seek to advocate on behalf of Palestinian self-determination.
This unique work examines how the knowledge-power nexus is shaping the discourse around the Israel-Palestine conflict and restricting academic freedom. Beginning with a discussion of American Zionism, the work proceeds to explain why scholars working on the question of Palestine are often denied standard academic...

Fluency in Play: Computer Game Design for Less Commonly Taught Language Pedagogy by Judd Ethan Ruggill and Ken S. McAllister

Fluency in Play was written to provide K-16 teachers with an introduction to designing and building computer games for the foreign language classroom. At the heart of the book is the fact that computer games make excellent teaching tools. They combine two of the fundamental processes of new language acquisition—play and exploration—with the power and pleasures of fun. Computer games are also dynamic, scalable, and ductile; they can be drawn out and shaped to fit an infinite number of classroom...